Monday, May 12, 2008

This weeks Blog Interview

This week I'm going to interview Adam Magro who is a former professional rugby player. Adam was educated at Sydney Boys High School so we know he's posh and the University of New South Wales, where he gained a BComm in finance and a law qualification so we know also that he has no useful attributes academically. He recently got his MSc in nature, society and environmental policy...whatever the hell that is...from Oxford University. Adam also holds the distinction of being just about the oldest member of every team he has ever played for. He has experience all round the world, having been part of the ACT Brumbies squad in Australia, having spent a season playing club rugby in Japan and more recently for my local readers warmed the bench far too often for Leinster. His home club is Randwick back home in Sydney (go the Galloping Greens) and he also has the distinction of having the nicest hair of any athlete I have ever worked with.

Adam is quality people and I know there are people who are interested in or involved in rugby who are reading this blog so if you have any questions you'd like me to ask regarding training for rugby or hair care...then fire away.

15 comments:

mimo said...

Wow, aren't you overestimating the number of readers of this blog? I mean, athletics people,rugby people,i know i'm a everything person(the end result being suck at everything).....

Will Heffernan said...

I figure there are at least 15 people now maybe 20...I coach rugby players and have athletes involved in athletics...so I figured it was a pretty safe bet.

You should surely be able to think of some questions for some of these athletes?

mimo said...

Yep. Don't worry, i'll work on it

Will Heffernan said...

I wouldn't go so far as to say I was 'worrying'...I've plenty of questions...just thought others might have even better ones.

mimo said...

Well, one of the questions i have can also be directed at you:

Do you take into account CNS stress when designing your programs? How do you manage this?

How important is single limb work,in your opinion,and why?

What kind of changes would you do to your programs if you were training regular people and not athletes?I see intervals every day, but, for an athlete who has practice everyday, that's needed,IMO,and managing intensity is the key.

Well, 3 questions,sorry.

StopCock said...

as [usually] an older member of most squads, what was the biggest challenge for you when trying to keep on the same level of speed/strength/endurance as the players who were more in, say, the spring of their careers? Did you train harder to maintain fitness? Or train less to avoid injuries?

Will Heffernan said...

Well, one of the questions i have can also be directed at you:

Do you take into account CNS stress when designing your programs?
Absolutely.
How do you manage this?
If I wrote a book about it would you buy it? This is what programming is...the management and planning of stress, fatigue and recovery. So I mainly manage it by writing good programs and by being able to adjust and or tweak them on the fly. I made a conscious decision not so very long ago to only write programs for people I coach...as in...if I'm not implementing the program then I'm not writing it and took a sizeable hit in the wallet doing so...but I just wasn't happy with not being able to physically monitor programs to make sure they were as successful as they could be.

How important is single limb work,in your opinion,and why?

Very important. Because they work independently of each other...I just think it is more effective...I tend to balance out the unilateral and bilateral stuff.

What kind of changes would you do to your programs if you were training regular people and not athletes?

I would charge more and work less. Basically the programs are goal specific...I've done plenty of personal training and used to specialise in getting brides in shape...I loved it...no body more motivated than a bride who wants to make all their bridesmaid's and friend sick with jealousy at her wedding day figure...and by God did I ever kick their arses.

I see intervals every day, but, for an athlete who has practice everyday, that's needed,IMO,and managing intensity is the key.

You're seeing a skewed data sample at the moment that should rectify itself over time as I write about different individuals...I've 150+ athletes that I am involved with at the moment to varying degrees...I'm not writing about all of them...if I did you would see some of them are doing no conditioning at all or low intensity steady state work.

Well, 3 questions,sorry.

mimo said...

Ok, i just came back from a class where my professor showed us how to work with several gadgets, like lactate readers, something similar to bodybugg,HR monitors and different kinds of software.Personally, i think most of it is useless unless we're dealing with high level athletes and monitoring all their training,not just in the gym.But let's see how cutting edge you are.
What kind of gadgets do you use regularly? The clock on the wall?

StopCock said...

who the fuck cares how cutting edge an coach is once they get results.

Added question for Margo/either/both of you, if you had to pick one athlete from a sport other than rugby to play rugby, who would you choose and why?

Will Heffernan said...

Mimo...I'm serious thinking about investing in a tendo unit but that's about as gadgety as I get.

Will Heffernan said...

stopcock...I'll ask that one for sure.

mimo said...

thanks Will.

Stopcock, i don't give a fuck about how cutting edge someone is.
I'm a big fan of simplicity myself, and the more i know, the more i think simple=better.
Tht was my point,exactly, and when someone tells me it's viable and recommended to use that kind of stuff with regular people, i'm speechless.

Will Heffernan said...

Boys...play nice...this isn't bodybuilding.com.

Anonymous said...

Will, I have a few questions here.

How do you feel rugby has changed with its emergence as a professional sport? and specifically

1. What differences were evident in the set up of a Super 12/14 team at the Brumbies vs a successful Sydney grade team at Randwick in terms of expectations and commitment to training, available facilities etc.? also how was the transition from semi-professional to fully professional in terms of lifestyle/recovery from training?

2. Do you think greater professionalism may account for the Brumbies consistent success, especially compared to other Australian sides?

3. Similar to 1, how does playing in Japan (I notice both Steve Larkham and Joe Roff have moved there recently) and Ireland compare to Brumbies and Randwick? Do you think countries like Japan or the US will ever approach the level of Australia/NZ/RSA etc.?

Thanks

Will Heffernan said...

Doing this interview tomorrow and Adam reads the blog so if you have any other questions...get them in today.